Competition Manipulation: True champions need to be beyond reproach!

True champions need to be beyond reproach!

You train hard for your competitions, and you deserve for them to be fair, with no cheating or any other form of competition manipulation.

As is the case with doping, it’s also YOUR responsibility to protect your sport. So don’t forget these two basic principles:

  • Don’t bet on your sport or on Olympic competitions!
  • Talk to someone! If anyone tries to persuade you to manipulate a competition or if you see any suspicious activity, report it!

More and more people are betting on sports competitions, particularly online. A lot of money can be at stake, and some people are prepared to go to extreme lengths to convince athletes to fix their competitions.

In order to preserve the credibility of your sport and competitions, you are strictly prohibited from betting on your competitions, or from losing or underperforming on purpose.

If you encounter a betting or match-fixing issue (someone losing on purpose, for example) report it to your coaches, your federation or your close circle, or write to: www.olympic.org/integrityhotline.

Did you know ...

… that a number of actions are considered to be rule violations (and can lead to sanctions)?

There are several ways that you could be in breach of the rules. You are strictly prohibited from: betting; fixing the outcome or direction of a competition (e.g. by underperforming on purpose); or passing on key information that could, for instance, lead to money being won through betting.

… that you cannot bet on the Olympic Games or the Youth Olympic Games?

As a general rule, you cannot bet on your sport or on another sport when it is part of a multi-sport event in which you are competing. During the Olympic Games or the YOG, it is strictly prohibited for any accredited individual to bet on Olympic Games or YOG competitions.

… that losing on purpose, or not trying your best, is a punishable offence?

Losing on purpose, playing poorly, underperforming, or not going quickly – for part or all of the competition – is called “competition manipulation” and is considered cheating. A monitoring system is in place, in cooperation with the sports federations, to expose potential cheats.

… that passing on inside information is prohibited?

Any information that is not public must remain confidential. Whether the information in question relates to a competition (strategy, weather conditions, equipment, etc.) or an athlete (fitness, injuries), it is important to stay discreet, including on social media.

… that there are solutions if someone asks you to fix a competition?

Even if you are put under pressure, if you are afraid or threatened, or if you think there’s no way out, remember that the best solution is to talk about it. If you can’t tell your coach, parents or friends, go to our hotline by clicking here and report the incident.


Ethics Code

To get to know a bit more, have a look at Ethics Code.

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